How-To

AutoDrill How-To Entries

Proper HydroSpeed Clamping Area

Feed Control Clamping Area Instructions

Typically, it is only appropriate to hold the feed control in a certain area when mounting it.  While there are special situations when this is not possible or desirable, the unit is designed to be held only at the very end as shown.

Proper Clamp Area on Hydro Speed

HydroSpeed Feed Control Clamp Area

The Hydro Speed feed control unit is built in such a way that holding it in the wrong are can damage it or even destroy it. However there are times when holding the unit in other areas is necessary.  Please contact us if you need to discuss a special application.

Holding the HydroSpeed Feed Control in the wrong area can cause:

  • Improper feed rates
  • Unreliable retraction of feed rod
  • Unreliable extension of feed rod
  • Damaged tooling
  • Damaged HydroSpeed unit
  • Excessive run out during your process
  • jumping or jerking of the machine during the process

What can I do to hold the HydroSpeed more effectively?

  • Most AutoDrill units are sold with proper clamping collars for the HydroSpeed unit.  However, some people slide the feed control too far forward and clamp in the wrong area. Try to move your stop rather than adjusting the Hydro Speed significantly.
  • If you need simple control during free travel, use a pneumatic flow control on the AutoDrill unit to achieve this. The HydroSpeed should generally be used during the actual work interface process only.
  • Special mounts can sometimes be created to hold the feed control. these include over-sized clamps to spread the clamping pressure out more evenly or set-ups that make use of the snap ring grooves on the feed control body.

Please CONTACT US to discuss your application and receive prompt product cost, literature and technical help.

Core Drill Speeds (Diamond)

Diamond Core Drill Speeds

These speeds are estimated only.  Please contact your tooling manufacturer with specific details about the material and machine running the tooling for more accurate information.

WIRE DRILLS CORE DRILLS AND SIMILAR BY OUTSIDE DIAMETER
.75 – 2.5 mm 1/8 to 1/2 inch 5/8 to 1-1/2 inch 1-3/4 to 2-3/4 inch 3 to 4 inch
30,000 TO 18,000 rpm 2,400 -1,000 rpm 1,250 – 1,000 rpm 1,100 – 850 rpm 850 – 200 rpm

NOTE: Never run diamond tooling dry. Not many people realize it, but a diamond is flammable because it is essentially carbon. If you have enough heat and oxygen, it will burn the same as a lump of coal – just a bit more slowly. Drilling without proper coolant in place produces enough heat to “burn” off the tips of diamond tooling and dull or even destroy the tooling completely.

  • You should use higher volumes of coolant when the hardness of the material increases. Sparks or a dry, crumbly residue while drilling are not a good sign! These indicate too little coolant.  You need to make sure that the set-up is immediately changed. Coolant must reach the drilling area.
  • Proper use of coolant helps increase diamond drilling efficiency. It reduces heat. It lowers the chance of cracking or otherwise damaging the part being drilled or the tooling.
  • Proper use of coolant will help flush away debris. It helps guarantee proper lubrication of the drill. Often times, using an up and down motion (peck drilling) keeps fresh coolant in the proper area. AutoDrill offers a through-the-tool coolant option. There is always a fresh supply of coolant at the tool with this option.

WHY DO MY TOOLS WEAR QUICKLY OR BREAK?

Note that excessive tool wear or breakage is often caused by one of the following:

  • Improper surface speeds
  • Improper feed rates
  • Dull tooling or clogged tooling
  • Hard spots in the material
  • Improper coolant or lubricant type (never run diamond tooling dry!)
  • Inadequate coolant or lubricant (overall for debris removal, rubbing, etc.)
  • Inadequate coolant or lubricant (at the tip of the tooling)
  • The tool is not rigid enough
  • Too deep of a cut without proper chip removal – Chip packing (try peck drilling to get coolant down there, get debris out, etc.)
  • Tools that were manufactured or used incorrectly on previous jobs

Please CONTACT US to discuss your application and receive prompt product cost, literature and technical help.

Suggested Drilling Feed Rates (Estimated)

Inches Per Revolution

The following chart shows estimated numbers only.  AutoDrill normally suggests running conservative speeds and feeds whenever the cycle time is not critical. By controlling the heat build up and taking a proper cut, you can make a cleaner hole and tooling will last longer.

MATERIAL BRINELL    HARDNESS HOLE DIAMETER
1/16″ 1/8 1/4 1/2 3/4 1 1 1/2 2
Aluminum 99-101 .001 .003 .007 .012 .016 .020 .025 .030
Aluminum Bronze 170-187 .001 .003 .004 .008 .010 .012 .015 .020
Balkelite .002 .005 .006 .008 .010 .012 .015 .015
Brass 192-202 .001 .003 .004 .008 .012 .018 .020 .022
Bronze, Common 166-183 .001 .003 .004 .008 .012 .018 .020 .022
Bronze Phos.; 1/2 Hard 187-202 .001 .003 .004 .008 .010 .012 .015 .020
Bronze Phos.; Soft 149-163 .001 .003 .004 .008 .012 .018 .020 .022
Celluloid .002 .004 .005 .006 .006 .008 .008 .010
Copper 80-85 .001 .003 .004 .008 .010 .012 .015 .020
Copper Mang.; 30% Mn 134 .001 .003 .005 .007 .009 .012 .014 .016
Duralumin 90-104 .001 .003 .005 .010 .015 .018 .020 .025
Iron, Cast; Med Soft 196 .001 .003 .005 .008 .010 .012 .014 .015
Iron, Cast; Hard 293-302 .001 .003 .005 .007 .009 .012 .012
Iron, Cast; Chilled 402 .001 .003 .005 .007 .009 .011 .011
Iron, Malleable 112-126 .002 .004 .007 .010 .012 .015 .018
Monel 149-170 .002 .003 .006 .008 .010 .012 .015
Nickel, Pure 187-202 .002 .003 .006 .008 .015 .018 .020
Nickel, Steel; 3 1/2% 196-241 .002 .003 .006 .008 .010 .012 .015
Rubber, Hard .005 .010 .012 .015 .018 .020 .025 .030
Screw Stock, C.R. 170-196 .001 .003 .004 .007 .010 .012 .015 .018
Stl, Carbon 175-225 .001 .003 .004 .007 .010 .012 .015 .018
Stl, Drop Forged 170-196 .001 .002 .004 .007 .010 .012 .015 .018
Stl, Machinery 170-196 .001 .003 .005 .009 .012 .013 .018 .022
Stl, Magnet; Soft 241-302 .002 .003 .006 .008 .009 .010 .011
Stl, Magnet; Hard 321-512 .0005 .001 .002 .002 .003 .003 .004
Stl, Mang.; 7-13% 187-217 .0005 .001 .002 .002 .003 .003 .004
Stl, Mild; .20-.30C 170-202 .001 .003 .005 .010 .015 .018 .020 .025
Stl, Molybdenum 196-235 .002 .004 .006 .010 .012 .015 .018
Stl, Spring 402 .002 .003 .005 .007 .009 .010 .010
Stl, Stainless 150-225 .001 .002 .004 .006 .008 .011 .013 .016
Stl, Stainless 460-520 .0005 .001 .002 .002 .003 .003 .004
Stl, .40-.50C 170-196 .001 .002 .004 .007 .010 .012 .015 .018
Stl, Struct; A-36 160 .001 .003 .005 .010 .015 .018 .020 .025
Stl, Tool; SAE, Forged 149 .002 .003 .006 .009 .011 .014 .016
Stl, Tool; SAE, Forged 402 .0005 .001 .002 .002 .003 .003 .004
Zinc, Alloy 112-126 .002 .003 .007 .012 .016 .018 .020 .025

Note that some materials such as Stainless Steel tend to drill better when you take an aggressive cut.  This is partially because the drill tool is going through fresh “cool” material rather than an area that was heated up from the previous pass of the cutting surface.  Always check with the tooling manufacturer for suggested RPM, thrust and feed rates when possible.

Please CONTACT US to discuss your application and receive prompt product cost, literature and technical help.